Tag Archives: mushroom morel

Sparky’s Tip of the Week #8 – Safety Equipment

Share in top social networks!

Sparky’s Tip of the Week #8 – Safety Equipment

Tips by Sparky

Tips by Sparky

 

Safety Equipment is essential to having a good and safe experience. You can never predict when a disaster will happen.

“Be Prepared” is a Boy Scout’s motto, so always go prepared. Do not leave it in the vehicle either.

When mushroom hunting, you are most often off trail and in the wilds, so being prepared can save your life

On Your Body:

—   Polyester or wool clothes + (During hunting season, advise wearing orange or red)

—   Rain pants +

—   Rain jacket +

—   Sturdy boots, water resistant or water proof +

—   Hat – appropriate for conditions +

—   Gloves

—   Wristwatch +

—   Compass + & mirror +

—   Whistle +

—   Hand lens

—   FRS walkie-talkie radio (optional)

—   GPS (optional)

—   Gaiters

—   Flashlight (small) & extra batteries

For Collecting Mushroom

—   Container, basket or bucket +

—   Knife, brightly marked +

—   Waxed bags (optional)

—   Foam head paint brush

In Your Backpack

—   Good map of area +

—   Lunch +

—   Water +

—   Extra clothes +

—   Sunscreen

—   Insect repellent

—   Trowel & toilet paper +

—   Field guide and keys + (All the Rain Promises, and More… by David Arora)

—   Spore making equipment (white & black paper)

—   Notebook & pencil

—   Camera

—   Emergency blanket +

—   First aid kit +

—   Matches (waterproof) or lighter*and fire starter

—   Walking stick

—   Bring a permit for the respective National Forest, if needed.

               +  =  Essential equipment to take into the field.

Sparky’s recommendations:

Sparky says: bring at least all the + items above.

Sparky says: join Steve at www.tourswithsteve.com for a mushroom tour.      Click here for a free emailed brochure.

Share in top social networks!

3 Things to look for when hunting wild edible morel mushrooms on Mt Hood

Share in top social networks!

1. Weather—what has the weather been like? Warm, cool, rainy or dry will encourage or discourage fungi mycelium growth. What I look for is a wet period followed by a warm, dry weather spell.  A good website for weather is: Weather Underground http://www.wunderground.com/ 

2.  Habitat—morel mushrooms they can grow virtually anywhere.  They can grow solitary, in groups, scattered along the edge of woods, in burns, in urban areas, in bare soil, intermixed with groundcovers, along railroad tracks, orchards, paths, under leaves, under logs, under brush piles, in grassy areas, in shade, in sun, in part shade. You get the idea! Pretty much wherever they darn well please.

Morel habitat

3.  Identification of true morel—true morels have hollow cap and stem with the cap intergrown with the stem.  If they have solid like or cottony pith centers in the stem, or the cap is not attached to the stem, or no stem they can be Verpa, Gyromitra or Hevella.  It is generally not recommended to eat these genera. If eaten it should be done with caution. They are, in any case, much less tasty than true morels (Morchella)

Helvella

Gyromitra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

True Morel with hollow center

 

If you want to learn how to identify wild morel mushrooms, call Steve at TourWithSteve.com and join one of our foraging tours into the wilds of Mt Hood.

Share in top social networks!

3 Things To Do With Your Morels

Share in top social networks!

After you have gone into the woods, worked and sweated all day locating your treasured morel mushrooms, what are you going to do with them? Here are three suggestions of what to do with your morels:

1.  You are probably not going to like morels, so I will volunteer to take these unwanted orphans off your hands. In my heart of hearts, I want to help you through this distressing time. Donations are willingly and gratefully accepted.

2. So, you did not fall for that one. Try drying them so you can rehydrate them next autumn when morel season is a dream and you want to relive your adventure tour with Steve on Mt. Hood. Use a dehydrator to dry your morels and store them in an airtight container until you are ready to use them.  Then simply take a handful of dried mushroom, put into a bowl of lukewarm water until re-hydrated and then cook.  On a serious note: Morels need to be thoroughly cooked before eating. Never eat wild mushrooms raw.

Morels on trays ready for dehydrator

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. My favorite way to use morels is in an omelet or scrambled eggs. As noted above, cook morel first before adding to dishes.

Egg & cheese omelet with morel mushrooms

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want to learn about wild morel mushrooms, call Steve at TourWithSteve.com and join one of our foraging tours into the wilds of Mt Hood.

Share in top social networks!

Using Dogs to find Morels

Share in top social networks!

This highly controversial and seldom discussed subject is not often seen in print. Using dogs or any other animals to find fungi is frequently touted as a green, sustainable, environmentally acceptable way of hunting.

Sparky not really interested looking for Morels

Now my dog, Sparky is a border collie. Border collies are among the smartest breed of dogs. However, even with an IQ of about a 3-4 year old human, he is still looking for truffles. There must be something about the scent of morels Sparky does not find attractive. Frankly, I have almost given up hope he will find even one morel unless he sits on one. Perhaps, if I let him sleep with the morels, he will start dreaming of them as I do. And I do often dream of hunting morel mushrooms on Mt. Hood.

Sparky trying hard to please his master

Sparky trying hard to please his master

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In conclusion, using a dog is an excellent way to sustainably forage for morels (because you will never find them that way). If you want to collect morel mushrooms ethically and sustainably, call Steve at tourwithsteve.com and join one of our foraging tours into the wilds of Mt Hood.

Share in top social networks!

What are Morel Mushrooms?

Share in top social networks!

Morel mushrooms are a highly sought fungi by people, other animals and insects.  The esteem for these little fungi reaches back through history and beyond. They are fun to hunt and find. They do, however, take a trained eye to locate these most elusive of mushrooms.

10 morels

 

Technically, Morels or Morchellaceae is a small family incorporating three genera Morchella, Verpa and Disciotis.  Of the three, Morchella is highly desirable and most sought after. Verpa is often found but is less desirable as some people experience gastric distress after eating.  Disciotis is easily confused with Peziza and Discina, which may or may not be edible.

Do you want to learn more, contact Steve at tourwithsteve.com and join one of his foraging tours into the wilds of Mt Hood.

Share in top social networks!

Mushroom Report as of April 24, 2012

Share in top social networks!

This was to be a weekly report but it has become more periodic. The truth is until recently, fungi activity has been low BUT that has changed with the onset of warmer weather. Mushrooms are beginning to fruit. The most notable are morel mushrooms and oyster mushrooms.

Yellow Morel Mushroom

Do you want to learn more, contact Steve at tourwithsteve.com and join one of his foraging tours into the wilds of Mt Hood.

 

Share in top social networks!