Tag Archives: GPS

Sparky’s Tip of the Week #8 – Safety Equipment

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Sparky’s Tip of the Week #8 – Safety Equipment

Tips by Sparky

Tips by Sparky

 

Safety Equipment is essential to having a good and safe experience. You can never predict when a disaster will happen.

“Be Prepared” is a Boy Scout’s motto, so always go prepared. Do not leave it in the vehicle either.

When mushroom hunting, you are most often off trail and in the wilds, so being prepared can save your life

On Your Body:

—   Polyester or wool clothes + (During hunting season, advise wearing orange or red)

—   Rain pants +

—   Rain jacket +

—   Sturdy boots, water resistant or water proof +

—   Hat – appropriate for conditions +

—   Gloves

—   Wristwatch +

—   Compass + & mirror +

—   Whistle +

—   Hand lens

—   FRS walkie-talkie radio (optional)

—   GPS (optional)

—   Gaiters

—   Flashlight (small) & extra batteries

For Collecting Mushroom

—   Container, basket or bucket +

—   Knife, brightly marked +

—   Waxed bags (optional)

—   Foam head paint brush

In Your Backpack

—   Good map of area +

—   Lunch +

—   Water +

—   Extra clothes +

—   Sunscreen

—   Insect repellent

—   Trowel & toilet paper +

—   Field guide and keys + (All the Rain Promises, and More… by David Arora)

—   Spore making equipment (white & black paper)

—   Notebook & pencil

—   Camera

—   Emergency blanket +

—   First aid kit +

—   Matches (waterproof) or lighter*and fire starter

—   Walking stick

—   Bring a permit for the respective National Forest, if needed.

               +  =  Essential equipment to take into the field.

Sparky’s recommendations:

Sparky says: bring at least all the + items above.

Sparky says: join Steve at www.tourswithsteve.com for a mushroom tour.      Click here for a free emailed brochure.

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Sparky’s Tip of the Week #7 – Outdoor Clothes

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Sparky’s Tip of the Week #7 – Outdoor Clothes

Tips by Sparky

Tips by Sparky

 

Sparky has decided to write his own outdoor column called “Sparky’s Tip of the Week”. He hopes you enjoy some of his insights. And now some more timely Tips from Sparky.

This is tough subject for Sparky to discuss because he is not much of fashion icon. He only has one coat and he has had it since birth. Consequently, he has asked me to share some of my thoughts. I will start from the bottom up.

Shoes: Shoes maybe the most important item in terms of comfort and safety. Often when in the forest in the autumn on Mt Hood it is raining or as we like to say ‘dumping on us with liquid sunshine’. Be that as it may, you need knobby or lug sole that do not slip for safety. Waterproofness is a real bonus to comfort. Ankle support is beneficial climbing over blown down trees and uneven ground.

Rubber boots

Rubber boots can keep you dry but they offer little or no support.

Rain gear: Do you want day in the woods to be a short miserable trip or an all day blast walking in the rain finding many golden treasures. Even if it is not raining, the foliage is often wet because it just stopped raining. If don’t have rain gear, you will soon be soaked to the bone.

 

Rain gear

Gloves: I could write a book about this topic. I must have twenty different kinds of gloves for different jobs and occasions. I have cotton, leather, rubber, coated cotton, rubber-dipped cotton, gardening, dress, winter, GORE-TEX ®, nitrite gloves, fingerless, wool, and more.

 

Work gloves

Hats: This is another favorite subject and everyone has an opinion. I used hats with wide brims all the way around and a chinstrap if in heavy brush. I use wool in the winter, cotton in spring & summer.

 

Wool hat and scarf

Pants: In dry weather, denim cotton is fine but in wet weather, you are miserable and subject to hypothermia. Wool pants are good but heavy. We live in a blessed time with many new synthetic fabrics that resist water and wear as well as being lightweight.

Shirts: Stay away from cotton except in the warmer weather. Synthetic fabrics are better and dry faster.

Underwear: Do not forget this important piece of personal equipment. Again stay away from cotton. It is comfortable to wear in the warm summer weather but not in the fall and winter when you will be exerting yourself and sweating. Having wet clothes next to you skin tends to cool your body. Not a good idea when it is cold and wet outside.

 

Sparky’s recommendations: Dogs have it made in the shade. When they get wet, they just shake the water off….on me. Stay away from cotton fabrics as much as possible, including underwear. There is wonderful wicking and quick drying clothes fabrics available today. Invest in your comfort and safety.

Boots: get leather boots with lug soles and waterproof the heck out of them. It works!

Outdoor boots

Rain Gear: GORE-TEX ® is great stuff and lightweight. GORE-TEX ® waterproofing needs to be renewed occasionally.

Official Gore-Tex® Label

Gloves: get cheap nitrite gloves at the pharmacy because it will protect your fingers and keep them warm plus get fingerless wool gloves to put over the nitrite gloves to keep your hands warm. Wool even when wet will keep your hands warm. Using the combination keeps your hands warm, protected and dry but allows good tactile dexterity to touch and feel.

Hats: Whatever works for you works for me. I use an old Pendleton felt wool hat with wide brim in wet weather. It keeps my head warm and dry. In the warmer, dryer weather, I found this hat at the Army surplus store. It is a camouflage hat with brim to keep the sun off my neck for $3.50.

My Winter Hat

Cameo Hat

 

 

 

 

 

Pants: After years of looking for the perfect pants, I found in L.L.Bean catalog the upland briar pants. They have a GORE-TEX

version that is perfect for fall and winter excursions into the forest.

Shirts:  Use synthetic fabric; my preference is for Patagonia brand clothes. Much of what I have, I purchased I have used continuously for over 23 years and it still look almost new. Amazing clothes!

Underwear: Find wicking synthetic fabric underwear. It is available today in short and longjohn versions. It can be found in your better quality outdoors stores, like REI and Patagonia

Sparky Says: Use synthetic fabrics as much as possible to wick away moisture from your skin. Wool is a second best. With cotton fabrics, you will not often notice the wetness until you have to stop. When wet a chill followed by hypothermia. This can happen very quickly. Proper clothes are very important for personal safety. One mistake could be fatal.

Sparky says: join Steve at www.tourswithsteve.com for a mushroom tour. Click here for a free emailed brochure.

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Sparky’s Tip of the Week #6 – Forest & Mushroom Ethics

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Sparky’s Tip of the Week #6 – Forest & Mushroom Ethics

- Tips by Sparky

Sparky has decided to write his own outdoor column called “Sparky’s Tip of the Week”. He hopes you enjoy some of his insights.

Caution: Some of the pictures in the following tip may upset you. Sparky gets freaked out, too!

Forest Ethics & Etiquette

  • If you bring it into the woods, bring it home. Please do not dump your garbage in the forest.

Trash

  • This including gun cartridge shells. Someone has to pick it up. Besides being unsightly, it is potential dangerous to other people and animals.

Garbage dumped in forest

  • If Mother Nature calls, bury it! including toilet paper so it decomposes and not stepped in or run into water supply.
  • Treat the forest with respect; it is our legacy to future generations.

Dumped tires

  • Treat other people you meet with respect. The forests have many uses including logging, hunting and many forms of recreation.

 

Mushroom Picking Ethics & Etiquette

  • Pick only what you can use.
  • Do not pick an area clean always leave some mushrooms behind.
  • If you meet someone else picking mushrooms in the forest, say hello but do not start picking mushrooms in their patch, it might be dangerous.
  • It is better to cut the stems than to pull up entire mushroom. There may be a new mushrooms forming below.
  • Picking mushroom will not kill them but may help spread its spore. Mushrooms are like fruit on a tree. Drop a spore and grow a new mushroom next year.
  • Mushrooms are the sign of a healthy ecosystem.

Ramaria (Coral Mushroom) fruiting in forest

  • Mushrooms are a valuable, renewable resource to be enjoyed and appreciated.

 

Photographing mushrooms

Sparky says: join Steve at www.tourswithsteve.com for a mushroom tour and learn about forest & mushroom ethics.

Click here for a free emailed brochure.

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Sparky’s Tip of the Week #4 – GPS Receivers

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           Tips by Sparky

Tips by Sparky

Sparky’s Tip of the Week #4 – GPS Receivers

Sparky has decided to write his own outdoor column called “Sparky’s Tip of the Week”. He hopes you enjoy some of his insights.

GPS Receivers

GPS Receivers are high tech equipment commonly used in car, boats, cell phones and hand held units. The value of the GPS Receivers is to give real time location within 10 feet 95% of the time using a network of 24 orbiting satellite. In urban area, GPS units are usually very functional.

You can choose from many different models of GPS Receivers. They can be loaded with either road maps or topographical maps or both. If you are going off-trail, topographical maps are recommended.

Here is some common features on GPS Receivers

  1. Tracking waypoints & routes
  2. Built in memory
  3. Camera & video
  4. Water resistance
  5. Barometric altimeter
  6. Wireless communication
  7. Tracker/Satellite messaging units
  8. Adding additional maps

When choosing a GPS Receivers you must consider what your main purpose is; off-trail or road or both.

Sparky’s recommendations: If you have been reading Sparky’s recommendations, you know by now to stay away for all the bells & whistles. Get a unit that will do exactly what you want to do. That is to get you from point A to B and back again. Make sure it is loaded with road & topographical maps of where you want to go. Units are generally not preloaded with topographical maps. If you are a road hunter, you may not need topographical maps.

The best thing about GPS Receivers is you still need a map and compass. Yup! That’s right. If you batteries fail or you are unable to get a signal because of tree cover, sunspot interference or you are at the bottom of a canyon, what good are GPS Receivers? You are probably going to have to take a class to learn how to best use your GPS Receivers units.

Bottom line is if you like playing with new technology, get one of these units. If you want to find your way around the wood and make it back home, stick with the reliable analog baseplate compass. Take a map & compass class; it will be much more useful.  For more info on compasses, see Sparky’s Tip of the Week #1.

Additional note: Many smart phones include GPS apps but these do not offer the same mapping and route planning capabilities as entry-level GPS Receivers.

Expect to pay $89 to $600 at any good outdoor store like REI, Cabellas, L. L. Bean.

Sparky says: join Steve at www.tourswithsteve.com for a mushroom tour. Click here for a free emailed brochure.

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